Ancient Mesopotamian Jemdet Nasr Period Stone Amulet - 3300 BC

A charming ancient Near Eastern, Jemdet Nasr Period stone amulet, circa 3300 - 2900 BC.

The stylised quadruped is shown standing with head turned to face the viewer, staring out through large, circular eyes, the body is similarly decorated with ring dot incisions.

Small animal figurines are common in the early Mesopotamian period and they were often presented in temples as votive offerings to the gods. Though ultimately a religious offering, this amulet would originally have been in the possession of a single individual. Given that this piece appears to be an imitation of something larger and more expensive its owner was likely someone of lesser means, though certainly not a slave. In Mesopotamian folk beliefs, objects such as this were not considered inanimate but rather potentially alive. They were considered to be powerful conduits for sympathetic magic and people sought their protection against potentially dangerous spirits.

The ultimate decision to give up the amulet as a votive offering to the gods was likely driven by the owner desiring something specific from them, possibly for a good harvest or luck in the upcoming birth of a child.

A striking, abstract Early Bronze Age sculpture and a facinating remnant of early Mesopotamian folk beliefs.

Ancient Mesopotamian Jemdet Nasr Period Stone Amulet - 3300 BC. A charming ancient Near Eastern, Jemdet Nasr Period stone amulet, circa 3300 - 2900 BC. The stylised quadruped is shown standing with head turned to face the viewer, staring out through large, circular eyes, the body is similarly decorated with ring dot incisions. Small animal figurines are common in the early Mesopotamian period and they were often presented in temples as votive offerings to the gods. Though ultimately a religious offering, this amulet would originally have been in the possession of a single individual. Given that this piece appears to be an imitation of something larger and more expensive its owner was likely someone of lesser means, though certainly not a slave. In Mesopotamian folk beliefs, objects such as this were not considered inanimate but rather potentially alive. They were considered to be powerful conduits for sympathetic magic and people sought their protection against potentially dangerous spirits. The ultimate decision to give up the amulet as a votive offering to the gods was likely driven by the owner desiring something specific from them, possibly for a good harvest or luck in the upcoming birth of a child. A striking, abstract Early Bronze Age sculpture and a facinating remnant of early Mesopotamian folk beliefs.

  • Price: $895.00 - In stock
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