Octahedrite Iron Meteorite from the Odessa Crater, Texas

A stunning Octahedrite iron meteorite, part of the famous Odessa impact, which fell to the earth from space around 63,000 years ago. Iron meteorites are thought to be the cores of asteroids that melted early in their history, only around 5% of meteorites that fall to earth are iron examples.

This meteorite, like the vast majority that impact the Earth’s surface, would have been born in a huge impact between two large bodies in the asteroid belt lying between Mars and Jupiter. It was part of the debris of this collision, sent hurtling towards earth by the impact.

Captured by Earth's gravitational force around 63,000 years ago, it would have accelerated to over 7 kilometres per second and upon entering Earth's thick atmosphere the friction would have caused it to flash across the sky like a firework, before it finally crashed to the ground in modern North America. We can only imagine what ancient man would have made of this great fireball lighting up the heavens.

Discovered in 1921 by James Williams at Odessa, Texas, the impact crater this meteorite created measured about 530 feet in diameter, emphasising the magnitude of the collision.

Octahedrite Iron Meteorite from the Odessa Crater, Texas. A stunning Octahedrite iron meteorite, part of the famous Odessa impact, which fell to the earth from space around 63,000 years ago. Iron meteorites are thought to be the cores of asteroids that melted early in their history, only around 5% of meteorites that fall to earth are iron examples. This meteorite, like the vast majority that impact the Earth’s surface, would have been born in a huge impact between two large bodies in the asteroid belt lying between Mars and Jupiter. It was part of the debris of this collision, sent hurtling towards earth by the impact. Captured by Earth's gravitational force around 63,000 years ago, it would have accelerated to over 7 kilometres per second and upon entering Earth's thick atmosphere the friction would have caused it to flash across the sky like a firework, before it finally crashed to the ground in modern North America. We can only imagine what ancient man would have made of this great fireball lighting up the heavens. Discovered in 1921 by James Williams at Odessa, Texas, the impact crater this meteorite created measured about 530 feet in diameter, emphasising the magnitude of the collision.

  • Price: $900.00 - In stock