Ancient Chinese Spring & Autumn Period Archaic Ritual Bronze Dou Vessels 豆 - 771 BC

A pair of ancient Chinese ritual bronze food vessels, or dou, dating to the Spring and Autumn Period, 771 – 476 BC.

Cast in bronze and following ancient Neolithic styles, these dou are beautifully balanced. Their form is confident and visually arresting, the concave trays are encircled by low rounded sides, supported on thick cylindrical stems and standing on flared feet.

During the Spring and Autumn (eastern Zhou) Period, ancient Neolithic artefacts were prized and revered as symbols of a bygone age. As such, far more ancient styles could come to influence contemporary wares (particularly in the outlying regions of Mongolia), as demonstrated by these fine vessels. A remarkable testament to the reverence in which the ancient Chinese held their forbears, the individual who cast these vessels was following an artistic style that was already ancient.

In ancient China, ancestral worship was the predominant form of religion. Bronze vessels such as these, filled with food and wine, were set out every tenth day in a form of communal banquet for the ancestors to come and share with their living descendants. By honouring one's ancestors in this fashion, the ancient Chinese gained both power and protection against malevolent spirits.

For a similar, published vessel, please see: Treasures on Grassland: Archaeological Finds from Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region. Shanghai Museum: Shanghai.

 

Ancient Chinese Spring & Autumn Period Archaic Ritual Bronze Dou Vessels 豆 - 771 BC. A pair of ancient Chinese ritual bronze food vessels, or dou, dating to the Spring and Autumn Period, 771 – 476 BC. Cast in bronze and following ancient Neolithic styles, these dou are beautifully balanced. Their form is confident and visually arresting, the concave trays are encircled by low rounded sides, supported on thick cylindrical stems and standing on flared feet. During the Spring and Autumn (eastern Zhou) Period, ancient Neolithic artefacts were prized and revered as symbols of a bygone age. As such, far more ancient styles could come to influence contemporary wares (particularly in the outlying regions of Mongolia), as demonstrated by these fine vessels. A remarkable testament to the reverence in which the ancient Chinese held their forbears, the individual who cast these vessels was following an artistic style that was already ancient. In ancient China, ancestral worship was the predominant form of religion. Bronze vessels such as these, filled with food and wine, were set out every tenth day in a form of communal banquet for the ancestors to come and share with their living descendants. By honouring one's ancestors in this fashion, the ancient Chinese gained both power and protection against malevolent spirits. For a similar, published vessel, please see: Treasures on Grassland: Archaeological Finds from Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region. Shanghai Museum: Shanghai.  

  • Price: $9,150.00 - In stock
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