Large Shipwreck Salvaged Plate from the Tek Sing - 1822 AD

A spectacular, large Antique plate, transformed into a "marine artwork", salvaged from the Tek Sing shipwreck and dating to approximately 1822.

Lost for nearly 200 years on the ocean floor, this enchanting artefact has transformed, now covered in shells, corals, barnacles and marine plants. 

 

The Tek Sing is probably the most important Antique shipwreck ever discovered. This once magnificent vessel has rightly been compared to that most famous of ships, the Titanic. The Tek Sing, which means "True Star", was a Huge Trading Junk, measuring 165 feet long and weighing over 1000 tonnes. It left from Amoy in Southern China carrying the largest quantity of porcelain of any known wreck. The ship was destined for the port of Jakarta in Indonesia, from where the valuable cargo would be distributed to the lucrative Eastern and European markets. The Tek Sing also carried a human cargo - 1600 immigrants and nearly 400 crew and merchants. The immigrants were all Chinese, hoping to escape the Economic problems of Early 19th Century China, which were a prelude to the first Opium War.

An ill-fated decision by the Ship's captain to take a short-cut through the Gaspar Strait resulted in catastrophic damage to the ship, the death of 90% of those on board and the complete loss of its porcelain cargo to the cold waters of the South China Sea. The remnants of the Ship and its 190 surviving passengers were discovered the next morning by James Pearl and later recorded in Hursburgh's "Directions for sailing to the East Indies", 1848. The wreck was subsequently forgotten until its rediscovery in 1999 by salvage expert Michael Hatcher, who used Hursburgh's book of 1848 as his starting point! After this momentous discovery the precious porcelain cargo was carefully removed, conserved and eventually auctioned in 2000.

 

A wonderful, highly decorative, curiosity 

 

Large Shipwreck Salvaged Plate from the Tek Sing - 1822 AD. A spectacular, large Antique plate, transformed into a "marine artwork", salvaged from the Tek Sing shipwreck and dating to approximately 1822. Lost for nearly 200 years on the ocean floor, this enchanting artefact has transformed, now covered in shells, corals, barnacles and marine plants.    The Tek Sing is probably the most important Antique shipwreck ever discovered. This once magnificent vessel has rightly been compared to that most famous of ships, the Titanic. The Tek Sing, which means "True Star", was a Huge Trading Junk, measuring 165 feet long and weighing over 1000 tonnes. It left from Amoy in Southern China carrying the largest quantity of porcelain of any known wreck. The ship was destined for the port of Jakarta in Indonesia, from where the valuable cargo would be distributed to the lucrative Eastern and European markets. The Tek Sing also carried a human cargo - 1600 immigrants and nearly 400 crew and merchants. The immigrants were all Chinese, hoping to escape the Economic problems of Early 19th Century China, which were a prelude to the first Opium War. An ill-fated decision by the Ship's captain to take a short-cut through the Gaspar Strait resulted in catastrophic damage to the ship, the death of 90% of those on board and the complete loss of its porcelain cargo to the cold waters of the South China Sea. The remnants of the Ship and its 190 surviving passengers were discovered the next morning by James Pearl and later recorded in Hursburgh's "Directions for sailing to the East Indies", 1848. The wreck was subsequently forgotten until its rediscovery in 1999 by salvage expert Michael Hatcher, who used Hursburgh's book of 1848 as his starting point! After this momentous discovery the precious porcelain cargo was carefully removed, conserved and eventually auctioned in 2000.   A wonderful, highly decorative, curiosity   

  • Price: $3,750.00 - In stock
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